FAO Media Centre: Health threats on horizon even as hunger declines in Europe and Central Asia

Posted: April 25, 2012 in Health, History, Human Rights, International, Politics, Region

The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned that obesity and diet-related illnesses could emerge as major health threats in Central Asia and Caucasus.

A FAO report links the trend to changing diet and lifestyle habits, as well as poverty.

The report warns that as diets shift from cereals toward higher consumption of meat and dairy products, the risk factors behind chronic, non-communicable diseases could rise in parts of the region.

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Health threats on horizon even as hunger declines in Europe and Central Asia

FAO Regional Conference for Europe meets to set priorities for food and agriculture

Diets are changing in the region.

18 April 2012, Baku, Azerbaijan – By 2030 undernourishment will be only a minor problem in Europe and Central Asia, but obesity and diet-related illnesses like heart disease could emerge as major challenges for public policy, FAO said today.

Hunger currently affects less than five percent of the population in most of the region but remains a significant concern in large parts of the Caucasus and Central Asia, according to a report to be presented at the start of the Organization’s biennial Regional Conference for Europe and Central Asia. However, the percent of people experiencing hunger in the Caucasus and Central Asia will drop from nine to two percent by 2030 and then to one percent by 2050, the report predicts.

The report goes on to warn that as diets shift from cereals towards higher consumption of meat and dairy the risk factors behind chronic, non-communicable diseases could rise in parts of the region. Besides diet, lifestyle habits, poverty and medical care also influence obesity, disease and death rates, the report adds.

These increased risk levels will place greater pressure on healthcare facilities in the poorer countries of Central Asia than in the EU.

via: RFE/RL

Also: FAO Media Centre: Health threats on horizon even as hunger declines in Europe and Central Asia.

This new set of realization will hopefully begin a reexamination of the commodity/imperial based ideology towards “food security”, to re-evaluate, and to consider the importance rather, of “Food sovereignty”.  One means simply getting a prescribed dose of calories, regardless of nutritional, cultural, social, or biological context, while sovereignty refers to people having safe and affordable access to culturally, and health-wise appropriate food.

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